Operating A Marine VHF Radio
 
 

Operating A Marine VHF Radio

WHAT TYPES OF MARINE VHF RADIOS ARE ACCEPTABLE?

The power output of your radio must not be more than 25 watts. You must also be able to lower the power of your radio to one watt or less. Your radio must be able to transmit on 156.8 MHz (Channel 16), 156.3 MHz (Channel 6) and at least one other channel.

Your radio must be type accepted or certified by the FCC. You can tell a type accepted radio by the FCC ID label on the radio. You may look at a list of acceptable radios at any FCC field office, FCC headquarters, or FCC Web Site.

MAY I INSTALL AND SERVICE MY MARINE VHF RADIO BY MYSELF?

You may install your radio in your ship by yourself. All internal repairs or adjustments to your radio must be made by or under the supervision of an FCC-licensed technician holding at least a General Radiotelephone Operator License. It is recommended that the radio be inspected by the service person when installed.

WHAT MARINE VHF CHANNELS MAY I USE?

The marine VHF channels are divided into operational categories, based on the types of messages that are appropriate for each channel, and are available for the shared use of all boaters. You must choose a channel which is available for the type of message you want to send. Except where noted, channels are available for both ship-to-ship and ship-to-coast messages.

The document Marine VHF Radio Channels contains a list of the marine VHF channels and their designated uses. The channels listed in the table are the only channels you may use, even if your radio has more channels available.

 

HOW DO I MAKE A CALL USING VOICE CALLING on VHF?

Maintain your watch. Whenever your boat is underway, the radio must be turned on and be tuned to Channel 16 except when being used for messages.

Power. Try one watt first if the station being called is within a few miles. If there is no answer, you may switch to higher power.

Calling coast stations. Call a coast station on its assigned channel. You may use Channel 16 when you do not know the assigned channel.

Calling other ships. Call other ships on Channel 16. You may call on ship-to-ship channels when you know that the ship is listening on both a ship-to-ship channel and Channel 16. NOTE: To do this the ship has to have two separate receivers.

Limits on calling. You must not call the same station for more than 30 seconds at a time. If you do not get a reply, wait at least two minutes before calling again. After three calling periods, wait at least 15 minutes before calling again.

Change channels. After contacting another station on Channel 16, change immediately to a channel which is available for the type of message you want to send.

Station identification. Identify, in English, your station by your FCC call sign, ship name, the state registration number or official number at the beginning and end of each message.

WHAT COMMUNICATIONS ARE PROHIBITED?

YOU MUST NOT TRANSMIT

  • False distress or emergency messages.

  • Messages containing obscene, indecent, or profane words or meaning.

  • General calls, signals, or messages on channel 16, except in an emergency or if you are testing your radio (these are messages not addressed to a particular station), or

  • When your ship is on land (for example, while the ship is on a trailer).

DO I HAVE TO KEEP A RADIO LOG?

You do not have to keep a radio log.

DO I NEED A COPY OF THE RULES?

Voluntary boaters are not required to keep a copy of the FCC's rules. Regardless of whether or not you have a copy of the rules, however, you are responsible for compliance. If you would like a copy of the rules, refer to Section VI.

DO I HAVE TO MAKE MY SHIP STATION AVAILABLE FOR INSPECTION?

Your station and your station records (station license and operator license or permit, if required) must be shown when requested by an authorized FCC representative.

WHAT HAPPENS IF I VIOLATE THE RULES?

If it appears to the FCC that you have violated the Communications Act or the rules, the FCC may send you a written notice of the apparent violation. If the violation notice covers a technical radio standard, you must stop using your radio. You must not use your radio until you have had all the technical problems fixed. You may have to report the results of those tests to the FCC. Test results must be signed by the commercial operator who conducted the test. If the FCC finds that you have willfully or repeatedly violated the Communications Act or the rules, your authorization to use the radio may be revoked and you may be fined or sent to prison.

HOW DO I CALL ANOTHER SHIP USING VOICE CALLING?

  • Make sure your radio is on.

  • Speak directly into the microphone in a normal tone of voice -- clearly -- distinctly.

  • Select Channel 16 (156.8 MHz) and listen to make sure it is not being used. NOTE: Channel 9 (156.45 MHz) may be used by recreational vessels for general-purpose calling. This frequency should be used whenever possible to relieve congestion on Channel 16.

  • When the channel is quiet, press the microphone button and call the ship you wish to call. Say "[name of ship being called] THIS IS [your ship's name and call sign (if applicable)]."

  • Once contact is made on Channel 16, you must switch to a ship-to-ship channel. The ship-to- ship channels are listed in the chart on page 6 of this Fact Sheet.

  • After communications are completed, each ship must give its call sign or ship name and switch to Channel 16.

 

HOW DO I CALL ANOTHER SHIP USING DSC?

Ships whose radios are fitted with DSC will be watching VHF Channel 70, as well as Channel 16. Channel 70 is exclusively used for digital selective calling.

The DSC is equipped with appropriate alarms to announce that a call has been received. Your radio operators manual should describe all of the available features and procedures for making and receiving calls.

Generally, you must know the MMSI number of the ship that you want to call, but if you suspect that the ship has DSC you can send an all ships call using low power first to a geographic area which only includes the intended vessel (coordinates are selected by operator prior to sending the call, check operators manual).

When you are in distress you can send a distress call to all stations. Other ships will acknowledge the call only after waiting to see if a coast station answers first. These acknowledgements will be on Channel 16. Only if no coast station has answered your call within a few minutes will another ship answer.

Certain cautions should be observed.

Do not send a distress call as a test. Severe penalties can result if false distress alerts are transmitted and not cancelled by the appropriate procedure.

Do not under any circumstances transmit a DSC distress relay call on receipt of a DSC distress alert from another ship on VHF or MF channels. In this case, you must listen on Channel 16 for 5 minutes. If no acknowledgement is noticed or no traffic is heard, acknowledge the alert by radiotelephony on Channel 16 and inform the RCC (Coast Radio Station, or Coast Guard).

HOW DO I PLACE A CALL THROUGH A PUBLIC COAST STATION?

Boaters may make and receive telephone calls to and from any telephone with access to the nationwide telephone network by utilizing the services of Public Coast Stations. Calls can be made to other ships or telephones on land, sea, and in the air.

MAKING SHIP TO SHORE CALLS

  • Select the public correspondence channel desired.

  • LISTEN to see if the channel is busy (i.e., speech, signaling tones, or busy signal).

  • If not busy, say, for example, "Pleasure craft [name of ship] calling [name of Public Coast Station] on Channel XX.

  • If busy, wait until the channel clears or switch to another channel.

  • When a coast station operator answers, say, "This is [name of ship and ships phone or billing number if assigned] placing a call to [city and phone number desired]." Give the operator billing information. If billing information for your ship has not been registered, the operator will ask for additional identification for billing purposes.

  • At completion of call say, "[Name of ship] OUT."

RECEIVING SHORE TO SHIP CALLS

To receive public Coast Station calls on VHF-FM frequencies, the receiver must be in operation on the proper channel. Coast stations will call on 156.8 MHz (channel 16) unless you have Ringer Service (which requires a second receiver).

SHIP TO SHIP CALLS

Contacts between ships are normally made directly but you can go through your coast station using the same procedure as ship to shore calls.

WHAT ARE THE MARINE EMERGENCY SIGNALS?

The three spoken international emergency signals are:

MAYDAY

PANPAN

SECURITE

When using an international emergency signal, the appropriate signal is to be spoken three times prior to the message.

You must give any message beginning with one of these signals priority over routine messages.

WHAT IS THE MARINE DISTRESS PROCEDURE?

  1. Speak slowly -- clearly -- calmly.

  2. Make sure your radio is on.

  3. Select VHF Channel 16 (156.8 MHz).

  4. Press microphone button and say: "MAYDAY --MAYDAY-- MAYDAY."

  5. Say "THIS IS [your ship ID]."

  6. Say "MAYDAY [your ship name]."

  7. Tell where you are: (what navigational aids or landmarks are near).

  8. State the nature of your distress

  9. Give number of persons aboard and conditions of any injured.

  10. Estimate present seaworthiness of your ship.

  11. Briefly describe your ship (meters, type, color, hull).

  12. Say: I will be listening on Channel 16."

  13. End message by saying "THIS IS [your ship name or call sign] OVER."

  14. Release microphone button and listen. Someone should answer. If not, repeat call, beginning at Item 3 above.

 

FCC Information (Forms, Fees, Rules)

FORMS

  • FCC Forms Distribution Center (800) 418-FORM (3676)

  • FCC Fax-On-Demand system -- call (202) 418-0177 from the handset of your fax machine. Follow the recorded instructions to have FCC Form 159 (document retrieval number 3000159), FCC Form 605 (document retrieval number 3060500), or FCC Form 605 (document retrieval number 3000605) sent directly to your fax machine.

  • For downloading at http://www.fcc.gov/formpage.html.

 

FEES

  • FCC Consumer Center (888) 225-5322

FCC RULES

All details concerning radio service eligibility, application procedures, operating requirements, and equipment standards can be found in the FCC Rules. Voluntary ships are not required to carry a copy of the rules.

Maritime Service Rules - 47 C.F.R. Part 80
Operator License Rules - 47 C.F.R. Part 13

The rules are available for a fee from the Government Printing Office at (202) 512-1803.

 
 

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Operating A Marine VHF Radio